Costumes

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  • Source
  • Reason
  1. commemorate the Purim miracle by wearing masks, giving an outward appearance that is different from our true appearance.
  • Is it permissible for a person to dress up on Purim as a member of the opposite gender?
  1. As a general rule, dressing up in clothing exclusive to the opposite gender is definitely a problem. The Torah expressly forbids such behavior: "A man's attire shall not be on a woman, nor may a man wear a woman's garment." Deuteronomy 22:5
  2. Rama (696:8). The reason is that the issur of cross dressing is because it promotes "Znus" but since on Purim it is done just for "simcha be'alma" fun the issur does not apply
  3. Mahari Mintz: he saw many people dress as members of the opposite gender on Purim in the presence of leading Hachamim, and the Hachamim did not object. Iin the context of the Purim celebration it is deemed permissible.
  4. Rama, records a custom to allow wearing on Purim clothes that contain Shaatnez on the level of Rabbinic enactment; these enactments were waived for the purpose of the special joy of Purim.
  5. Rambam and Rabbi Eliezer of Metz: dressing as a member of the opposite gender is forbidden under all circumstances
  6. Rav Chaim Kanievsky says in the name of the Chazon Ish that cross dressing on Purim is inappropriate even for children
  7. Hacham Ovadia Yosef rules that one may not dress up as a member of the opposite gender on Purim, or allow his sons to dress as girls or his daughters to dress as boys.
  8. A question was posed to Rav Dovid Feinstein as to whether wearing a woman’s wig on Purim in order to give the impression of long hair, while being dressed as a male, would be considered simlas isha. Rav Dovid Feinstein ruled that it would be considered simlas isha.