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# It is forbidden to set a timer before [[shabbat]] to automatically operate a dishwasher on [[shabbat]]. <ref> Shemirat Shabbat Kehilchata 12:37, Menuchat Ahava 1.24.31. The Shemirat Shabbat Kehilchata's proof is that when you close the door even though it is totally off it is considered a grama when the melacha will occur later like we find in Mishna Brurah 253:100. [http://www.yutorah.org/sidebar/lecture.cfm/859947/rabbi-hershel-schachter/status-and-applications-of-use-of-electric-appliances-and-devices-on-shabbat/ Rav Hershel Schachter (Electricity on Shabbat min 35)] explained that it was forbidden to use a dishwasher on Shabbat even if it is going to turn on at a later time since closing the door is considered a grama for when the timer will turn on.
Since the dishwasher doesn't function if it isn't closed it may not be used. It is also forbidden to illegally get a mechanic who will break the dishwasher so that it starts even if the door isn't closed.</ref>
===Watches===
# Most poskim are lenient to allow wearing an automatically winding watch if it is still running.<ref>Yabia Omer OC 6:35 writes that according to his opinion that as long as the watch is still running then it is certainly permitted to wear a watch that self-winds while it is still running. He adds that even those who hold that it is forbidden should agree with the automatic watch since it is a pesik reisha dlo nicha leh on a derabbanan. Additionally, it could be a shinuy and also derech levisha (Rav Poalim 1:26). Chelkat Yakov 1:75, Tzitz Eliezer 9:20, Shemirat Shabbat Khilchata p. 162, and [http://www.dailyhalacha.com/m/halacha.aspx?id=750 Rabbi Mansour] agree that an automatic watch is permitted. Az Nidbaru 2:39 says it is forbidden. </ref>
# According to many poskim the same is true of an electric automatic watch.<ref>The reasons for the mechanical self-winding watch seem to apply to the electric winding watch as well. See above. [http://www.eretzhemdah.org/newsletterArticle.asp?lang=en&pageid=4&cat=7&newsletter=1027&article=3894 Rabbi Daniel Mann on eretzhemdah.org] holds that it is permissible to wear the kinetic watch on Shabbat since the transfer of mechanic energy to electrical energy in a battery back into mechanical energy doesn’t create any circuit and is permitted. Additionally, it is similar to some of the arguments made about the automatic watch (that it is a pesik reisha, shinuy, derech levisha). [http://dinonline.org/2014/09/07/wearing-kinetic-watch-on-shabbos/ Rabbi Pfeffer on dinonline.org], [http://shut.moreshet.co.il/shut2.asp?id=9698 Rabbi Yisrael Rozen], and [http://www.yeshiva.co/ask/?id=4064 Rabbi Li’or on yeshiva.co] agree. However, [http://revach.net/ask/article.php?id=1509 Rabbi Moncharsh on revach.net] holds that it is forbidden.</ref>
# Winding a watch that stopped on Shabbat is forbidden. <ref>Chayei Adam 114:19 writes that it is Biblically forbidden to wind a watch on Shabbat since it is metaken like Eruvin 103a which says if harp string snaps it is a melacha to fix it. The Tiferet Yisrael in Kalkelet Hashabbat no. 38 argues that it isn’t a Biblical prohibition since tying a string on the harp is assembling parts of a instrument but when winding a watch there are no parts being attached. Chazon Ish also asks this but answers that the opinion of the Chayei Adam was that creating a functional unit is considered Boneh even if it isn’t the assemblance of units in a permanent way. In conclusion some hold that winding a stopped watch is a Biblical prohibition and others hold it is only rabbinic but either way it is forbidden. That is the conclusion of the Mishna Brurah 338:15 and Yabia Omer OC 6:35.</ref>
# However, if it is still running some poskim hold that it is permitted to wind it on Shabbat, however, others hold it is forbidden.<ref>Yabia Omer 6:35 explains that it is permitted since the whole issue with winding the watch is that it is equal to fixing it but if it didn’t stop that isn’t considered fixing it to prevent it from stopping. Even though the Mishna Brurah 338:15 is strict unless there is a need for someone sick unless you can find a non-Jew. Piskei Teshuvot 338:9 cites the Daat Torah 338, Minchat Shabbat 80:240, and Darkei Chaim VShalom 419 as lenient. Teshuvot Vhanahagot 1:202 quotes that Rav Chaim Ozer was lenient. In his discussion, Yabia Omer has some interesting comparisons to discuss this halacha. He writes that it is comparable to the Nodeh Beyehuda YD 201:35 who says that you can put boards into the mikveh and that’s not a problem of having a mikveh formed with something that’s mekabel tumah since it didn’t start like that even if those boards are preventing the mikveh from becoming invalid. Similarly, the Trumat Hadeshen writes that you can preemptively fix the letters of a mezuzah so that they don’t fade too much and it isn’t considered an issue of not writing the mezuzah in order. Lastly, it is like the Eliya Rabba who says that you can soak meat that was out for three days since you’re keeping status quo and just preventing its status from becoming forbidden and that isn’t considered fixing (tikun).</ref>
# Wearing a smartwatch or fitbit on Shabbat is forbidden.<ref>[http://www.zomet.org.il/?CategoryID=398&ArticleID=1050 Rabbi Rozen on zomet.org] explains that even if all the observable noises and notifications that the watch makes are turned off simply wearing it is forbidden since it isn't appropriate for Shabbat.</ref>
 
===Watches===
# Most poskim are lenient to allow wearing an automatically winding watch if it is still running.<ref>Yabia Omer OC 6:35 writes that according to his opinion that as long as the watch is still running then it is certainly permitted to wear a watch that self-winds while it is still running. He adds that even those who hold that it is forbidden should agree with the automatic watch since it is a pesik reisha dlo nicha leh on a derabbanan. Additionally, it could be a shinuy and also derech levisha (Rav Poalim 1:26). Chelkat Yakov 1:75, Tzitz Eliezer 9:20, Shemirat Shabbat Khilchata p. 162, and [http://www.dailyhalacha.com/m/halacha.aspx?id=750 Rabbi Mansour] agree that an automatic watch is permitted. Az Nidbaru 2:39 says it is forbidden. </ref>

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