Chol HaMoed

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Kavod and Oneg

  1. There’s a requirement of Kavod and Oneg on Chol HaMoed, such as having special food, drinks and clothing, but it is more lenient than kavod of Yom Tov. [1]
  2. As part of Kavod, one should wear clothes that a little better than weekday clothes. Some have the minhag to wear Shabbat clothing on Chol HaMoed. [2]
  3. As part of Kavod, some have the practice to leave the table cloth on the table all of Chol HaMoed. [3]
  4. As part of Kavod, one is not obligated to have a bread meal, however it is preferable to do so. [4]

Simcha

  1. There’s a requirement of Simcha on Chol Hamoed just like there is on Yom Tov. [5]
  2. One should fulfill simcha of Chol HaMoed with that which makes each person happy. Some say that this can be fulfilled with any activity that brings a person enjoyment. However, some have the practice to fulfill simcha as Chazal instituted concerning Yom Tov: men to drink wine, women by wearing new clothing, and children by getting toys or candies. [6]
  3. According to those who fulfill simcha on Chol HaMoed like simcha on Yom Tov, men should fulfill simcha with wine and not grape juice. [7]

Davening

Yaaleh VeYavo

  1. If one forgets Yaaleh VeYavo on Chol HaMoed one must repeat Shemona Esreh. [8]

Forbidden work

Severity of Melacha

  1. There’s a dispute whether melacha is Deoritta or Derabbanan on Chol HaMoed. We hold that the melacha is Derabbanan but are strict for the other opinion unless there’s great need. [9]

Tircha without Melacha

  1. A strenuous activity (one that involves exertion) is forbidden even if it doesn’t involve any Melacha. [10]
  2. For example, it’s forbidden to move heavy furniture (unless there’s a need see below). [11]

Degradation of the holiday

  1. Certain activities must be limited to avoid degradation of the holiday. For this reason, even when commercial activity is permitted it should be done in private. [12]
  2. For example, it’s forbidden to paint one’s apartment on Chol HaMoed to improve its appearance. [13]

When Melacha is permitted for no reason

  1. The forbidden melachot includes all 39 melachot and derabbanan’s of Shabbat and Yom Tov except for: carrying, going beyond techum (2000 amot), muktzah, VeDaber Dvar (preparing or talking about business issues), Havarah (lighting a fire), Tevilat Kelim, removing Trumah, [14]
  2. Shevitat Behemto (having one’s animal work or renting it out), and Mechamer (leading one’s animal) according to some apply on Chol HaMoed and some say that it doesn’t apply and there’s what to rely on to be lenient. [15]
  3. It’s permitted to go biking since that’s not considered a melacha. [16]

Is work done in violation forbidden from benefit?

  1. If one did violate Chol HaMoed unintentionally, one may be lenient and benefit from the work that day. However, if one violated the Chol HaMoed intentionally, that individual shouldn’t benefit from it forever, and others may benefit for it after the holiday. [17]

The five reasons which permit melacha

  1. Melacha on Chol HaMoed is forbidden just like Yom Tov, however, there are five major leniencies to permit Melacha on Chol HaMoed which are: 1) Tzorech HaMoed(work done for work a need for the holiday), 2) Tzorech Ochel Nefesh (work to prepare food), 3) Tzarchi Rabim (work needed for communal purpose), 4) Dvar HaAved (work done to avoid a loss), 5) Poel Shein Lo Mah Yochal (work done by a laborer who doesn’t have food to eat). [18]

Chart of the five reasons

Need of the holiday (Tzorech hamoed ) Making Food (Ochel Nefesh) Communal need (Tzarechei Rabbim) Financial loss (Dvar HaAved) A very poor worker (Poel Shein Lo Mah Yochal)
Professional labor (Maaseh uman) Forbidden [19] Permitted [20] Permitted [21] Permitted [22] Permitted
Excessive exertion (Tircha Yeterah) Permitted [23] Permitted [24] Permitted [25] Forbidden [26] -
Planning work for the holiday (Mitchaven LeMoed) Forbidden [27] Permitted [28] Permitted [29] Forbidden [30] -
Paying for the work (Socher BeDamim) Forbidden [31] Permitted but preferable to get a goy [32] Permitted [33] Permitted [34] Permitted
Work in Public (BeFarhesia) - for uman [35] Forbidden [36] Permitted [37] Forbidden [38] Forbidden
Working for after the holiday (LeAcher HaMoed) Forbidden [39] Forbidden [40] Permitted [41] - -

Tzorech HaMoed

  1. Work is permitted for Tzorech HaMoed meaning that unskilled work is permitted if done for a need for the holiday. However, skilled work is forbidden even for a need of the holiday. [42]
  2. Tzorech HaMoed is only permitted if the work entails no tircha (exertion) [43]
  3. It’s permitted to do an action even if it will involve violating a melacha indirectly if there’s a holiday need. For example, it’s permitted to cut branches in order to make Sachach for the Sukkah as long as one makes sure to only cut from one side of the tree. Another example, it’s permitted to wash one’s hands over grass. [44]

What’s called a holiday “need”?

  1. Anything where there’s a likely possibility that the work is needed is considered Tzorech HaMoed. [45]
  2. One may not delay doing a certain work from before Chol HaMoed and do it on Chol HaMoed. [46]
  3. Fixing a broken object is called a holiday need if the object will be needed, however, if there’s a replacement that can be used instead or one could easily borrow a replacement, fixing the chair isn’t a holiday need. [47]
  4. It’s permissible to vacuum in an area you usually vacuum once a week. [48]
  5. Some say it’s forbidden to nail a picture to a wall for decorative purposes, while others permit since it involves no skilled work or exertion. [49]
  6. It’s forbidden to garden, plant, dewed, or move grass on Chol HaMoed. Watering is only permitted if the plant is in danger of dying. [50]
  7. It’s permitted to pick flowers in order to decorate for the holiday. [51]

Simchat Chag

  1. An activity that brings one simcha is considered a holiday need as it’s a mitzvah to have simcha on the holiday. For example, going on a family trip is considered simchat haChag and so it’s permissible to wash one’s car windows or fill up the tank in order to drive to the park. [52]
  2. For example, since playing music is considered a simchat hachag, it’s permitted to fix (in an unskilled fashion) an instrument in order to play music for the holiday. [53]

Preparing from Chol HaMoed to Yom Tov

  1. It’s permitted to do work for a Tzorech HaMoed from one day of Chol HaMoed in preparation for the other days of Chol HaMoed or for days of Yom Tov. [54]

Melacha needed in preparation for a Tzorech HaMoed

  1. Just as unskilled work is permitted for a Tzorech HaMoed, so too it’s permitted to do preparatory work that’s nessecary for a Tzorech HaMoed. [55]
  2. For example, one may sharpen a pencil in order to writes a social letter for the Moed. [56]

Needs for others

  1. Unskilled work is permitted even for the need of others as long as one isn’t being hired. [57]
  2. One is allowed to hire a non-Jew to do work that’s permitted for a Jew to perform and it’s permitted to pay the non-Jew for the work. [58]

Examples

  1. For example, if a chair broke, it may be fixed in an unskilled manner is the chair is needed for the holiday, however, if another chair could be used or a chair could be borrowed one shouldn’t fix the chair. Additionally, if it takes carpentry skills to fix the chair or it was broken before the holiday and could have been fixed then, one may not fix the chair. [59]
  2. For example, it’s permissible to change a tire, jumpstart a car, or change it’s battery if the car will be used for festival purposes. [60] However, making other car repairs which require skilled work are forbidden to make (unless there’s a financial loss like having to leave your car on the road and having to return for it). [61]
  3. Washing or vacuuming the floor which is usually cleaned once or more times a week is permitted during Chol HaMoed. [62]
  4. One may change the tire of a car if the car is needed for use during the holiday. One may also change the tire for a friend’s car if one isn’t being paid. [63]
  5. Many forbid fishing for pleasure on Chol HaMoed, while some are lenient. If the fish will be eaten one may be lenient. [64]

Maaseh Uman

  1. For an unskilled man (not a tailor or adept at sewing), sewing is considered not a Maaseh Uman. However, the average women is proficient at sewing and so is considered an Uman. [65]
  2. A skilled worker may sew with a Shinui meaning making long stitches and the stiches should alternate between high and low (forming a zig-zag). [66]
  3. Since a Shinui isn’t possible when sewing on a bottom, it’s still permissible if one sews it on loosely and only uses 2 out of 4 holes (even the diagonal ones), while others say not to sew on a button at all. [67]
  4. According to some authorities it’s never considered a Shinui if a skilled person sews with a sewing machine while others are lenient if one makes a Shinui.

Preparation of food

  1. It’s permissible to do melachot in order to prepare food for the holiday (from one day of Chol HaMoed to another day of Chol HaMoed or from Chol HaMoed to Yom Tov). [68]
  2. It’s permissible even if the melacha was deliberately pushed off to doing it on Chol HaMoed. [69]
  3. If one has adequate supply of the specific food one shouldn’t cook that food on Chol HaMoed unless the fresher food will be tastier. [70]
  4. It’s permissible to take wages for cooking on Chol HaMoed food that’s needed for the holiday, however, it’s preferable to have a non-Jewish cook do it. [71]
  5. It’s permissible to fish on Chol HaMoed or to pick fruit on Chol Hamoed with intent to eat the fish or fruit. It’s permissible to fish or pick fruit abundantly so that one will be able to choose the choicest among them to eat. [72]

Cooking extra

  1. One may not cook on Chol HaMoed in order to have food after the holiday, however it’s permissible to cook generously without calculating precisely and if there’s leftovers, it’s permissible to have them after the holiday. [73]
  2. If one transgressed and did cook for after the holiday it’s still permissible to eat it. [74]

For whom?

  1. It’s permissible to cook for fellow Jews, but one may not do extra work in cooking for a non-Jew. If one is just adding more ingredients to the pot (not considered extra work for the non-Jew) it’s permissible. [75]
  2. It’s permissible to prepare food for guests even though it’s uncertain that they will come (as long as there’s a reasonable possibility). [76]

Preliminary preparations for food

  1. Preliminary preparations such as sharpening a knife or repairing a stove in order to make food for Yom Tov is permissible if one wasn’t able to fix in before Yom Tov. [77]
  2. It’s permissible to do preparations even in a skilled fashion and even if it involves excessive effort. [78]
  3. However it’s forbidden to intentionally postpone preliminary preparations from before the holiday until Chol HaMoed and if one did so, one may not work on it on Chol HaMoed. [79]
  4. One may only do work that would cause an improvement to the food itself which is true of a knife or stove, however, one may not fix a can-opener or a table as these do not enhance the food but rather these can only be fixed with unskilled work. [80]

Physical needs of a person

  1. It’s permissible to do work for the physical needs of a person (Tzarchei HaGuf) on Chol HaMoed even if it involves skilled work or excessive effort. [81]
  2. Therefore, one may shower with hot water and soap, brush one’s teeth on Chol HaMoed. Similarly, a women may apply cosmetics or tweeze eyebrow or body hair. [82]
  3. If one’s only pair of glasses break one may fix it or have a professional optician fix it. [83]
  4. It’s permissible to have a heater fixed if it’s very cold and an air conditioner fixed if it’s very hot on Chol HaMoed. [84]
  5. It’s permissible to treat a person’s health from illness or preventing a decline in health. However, many forbid doing work for a small ache or pain. [85]
  6. It’s permissible to take medications on Chol haMoed. [86]
  7. Some permit a regular medical checkup, whereas others advise avoiding it on Chol HaMoed. [87]

Taking a haircut

  1. It’s a mitzvah to take a haircut on Erev Yom Tov. [88]
  2. It’s forbidden to take a haircut on Chol HaMoed as the rabbis prohibited this so that people wouldn’t prepare properly before the holiday. [89]
  3. It’s forbidden to take a haircut even if one took one before the holiday. [90]
  4. This prohibition applies both to men and women [91] but not to children below the age of Bar or Bat Mitzvah if it is causing them discomfort. [92]
  5. Chazal did not make an exception for someone who was sick and was unable to cut one’s hair before the holiday and forbid him as well. [93]
  6. Chazal made a few exceptions and permitted certain people to cut hair on Chol HaMoed including a person who was released from prison on the holiday or late on Erev Yom Tov, one who arrives from over seas on Erev Yom Tov and was unable to cut one’s hair all of Erev Yom Tov, and one who was a mourner for a relative other than a parent, whose seventh day of mourning occurred on Erev Yom Tov which was Shabbat (and so he was unable to shave before the holiday). [94] Those who Chazal permitted to permitted to cut one’s hair should do so in private. [95]
  7. Cutting one’s hair for medical reason is permissible. [96]
  8. It’s permissible to comb or wash one’s hair even though predictably hairs will be pulled out. [97]

Shaving on Chol HaMoed

  1. In general it's forbidden to shave on Chol HaMoed unless this jeopardizes one’s job [98]
  2. Some authorities permitted someone who shaved on Erev Yom Yov to shave on Chol HaMoed if there's a great need or is pained by not shaving, however, if one is only shaving to look presentable one doesn't have to protest (there is what to rely on). [99]

Nail cutting

  1. Ashkenazim hold that it’s forbidden to cut one’s nails on Chol HaMoed, while Sephardim hold that it’s permissible. [100]
  2. If one cut one's nails on Erev Yom Tov one may cut them on Chol HaMoed. [101]
  3. It’s permissible to cut one’s nails with one’s hands or teeth. [102]
  4. If one usually cuts one’s nails on Erev Shabbat, it’s permissible to cut them on Chol HaMoed Erev Shabbat. [103]
  5. It’s permissible for a woman to cut her nails before going to the mikveh. [104]

Laundering clothing

  1. It’s forbidden to launder clothing, towels, linens, or tablecloths on Chol HaMoed as the rabbis prohibited this so that people wouldn’t prepare properly before the holiday. [105]
  2. It’s also forbidden to launder clothing in a washing machine. [106]
  3. If a child’s clothing are insufficient because they are soiled frequently it’s permissible to launder them on Chol HaMoed. If one is laundering them in a machine one may wash a full load of children’s clothing but adult’s clothing may not be added. [107]
  4. Chazal did not make an exception for someone who was sick and was unable to do laundry before the holiday and forbid him as well. [108]
  5. Chazal made a few exceptions and permitted certain people to do laudry on Chol HaMoed including a person who was released from prison on the holiday or late on Erev Yom Tov, one who arrives from over seas on Erev Yom Tov and was unable to do laundry all of Erev Yom Tov, and someone who was a mourner for a relative other than a parent, whose seventh day of mourning occurred on Erev Yom Tov which was Shabbat (and so he was unable to do laundry before the holiday). [109] Those who Chazal permitted to permitted to cut one’s hair should do so in private. [110]
  6. It’s permissible for a women to launder her support hose, nursing bras, and white underwear if she becomes Niddah on Chol HaMoed if she has insufficient to last for the whole holiday. [111]
  7. Drying cleaning is also forbidden like laundering. If one’s only suit became so soiled that it’s impossible to worn, some permit it to be dry cleaned, and one should consult a competent rabbinic authority. [112]
  8. If one’s only suit was stained, it’s permitted to remove the stain. [113]
  9. If a garment has a tough stain that won’t be removed if one waits until after the holiday, cleaning is permissible. [114]
  10. Ironing is permissible but pressing by a profession is forbidden. [115]
  11. Making pleats in a skirt or pants is forbidden. [116]
  12. There is a dispute whether it’s permissible to polish one’s shoes on Chol HaMoed, while everyone agrees one may brush it off. [117]
  13. It’s permissible to vaacum or wash floors that are usually cleaned at least once a week. [118]

Moving houses

  1. For example, it’s forbidden to move homes.[119]
  2. Nonetheless, if it’s intolerable to live under present conditions, there’s a loss of money one may certainly move homes. However, if one is moving from a rented house to one that one owns, or from a home which one splits with others to live in one’s own home there’s room to be lenient and preferably one should ask a rabbinic authority. [120]

Buying and Selling

  1. It’s forbidden to buy and sell in any amount on Chol HaMoed because of the exertion involved. [121]

Writing

  1. Writing in a professional manner/calligraphy is only permissible if there’s a public need, a loss of money, or a passing mitzvah. [122]
  2. Writing in a non-professional manner such as regular handwriting is permissible for a need of the holiday, public need, a loss of money, or a passing mitzvah. [123]
  3. Because of ‘need of the holiday’, it’s permissible to write a shopping list or a social letter. Additionally a child may draw. Some say that one should write on a slant so as to function as a Shinui (change from the norm). [124]
  4. Because of ‘a loss of money’ it’s permissible to write down a Torah thought (חידוש), take notes in a vocational course, write homework for school, or to write a bank deposit (if one fears losing the money). [125]
  5. Some consider typing on a computer like non-professional writing and so it’s permissible if there’s a ‘need of the holiday’. However, some consider typing like professional writing which is only permissible is there’s a public need, a loss of money, or a passing mitzvah. [126]
  6. Some permit using a camera (since it’s not similar to writing) for a ‘need of the holiday’, while some only permit if there’s a loss (such as if one will miss a rare opportunity to take such a picture). [127]
  7. Some permit using a copy machine (since it’s not similar to writing) for a ‘need of the holiday’, while some only permit in order to prevent a loss. [128]
  8. It’s permissible to use a tape recorder on Chol HaMoed. [129]

Going to work on Chol HaMoed

  1. If one may loose one’s job or if one can’t explain it to one’s employer and one will loose a promotion then it’s permissible to go to work. Additionally, it’s permissible to work for needs of the public community such as a work for the Shul. [130]
  2. If one will loose one’s usual customers if one doesn’t open one’s store on Chol HaMoed and not just a loss of income then it’s permissible to open one’s store on Chol HaMoed but still one should minimize one’s hours. [131]

Having Simchas

  1. It’s forbidden to have a wedding on Chol haMoed because of Ein Maarivin Simcha BeSimcha (one may not mix different Simcha’s). [132]
  2. It’s permissible to have a Brit Milah, Pidyon HaBen, or Siyum. [133]

Tefillin on Chol HaMoed

  1. The minhag of some Ashkenazim is to wear Tefillin on Chol HaMoed, and the minhag of Israel and minhag of Sephardim is not to wear Tefillin on Chol HaMoed. [134] Someone who doesn’t have a minhag should not wear Tefillin on Chol haMoed. [135]
  2. One who wears Tefillin should stipulate before wearing the Tefillin that if there’s an obligation then I wish to fulfill that obligation, and if not, I have no intention of fulfilling the mitzvah with my action. [136]
  3. If one wears Tefillin on Chol HaMoed one shouldn’t wear Tefillin of Rabbenu Tam(even if one usually wears Tefillin of Rabbenu Tam). [137]
  4. Some authorities hold that if some people in the Shul wear Tefillin and others don’t there’s a violation of Lo Titgodidu (don’t cause factions in observance of Torah) and so they advise that one should either find a shul that has your minhag or pray in different locations in the same shul. [138]

Work through a non-Jew

  1. It’s forbidden to instruct a non-Jew to do any activity that’s forbidden for a Jew to do on Chol HaMoed. [139]

References

  1. Sh”t Rabbi Akiva Eiger 1 (in the Hashmatot) and S”A HaRav 529:5 write that there’s no Kavod and Oneg on Chol HaMoed. On the other hand, Magan Avraham 530:1, Mishna Brurah 530:1, Sefer Chol HaMoed (pg 1; by Rabbi Dovid Zucker) write that there’s Kavod and Oneg on Chol HaMoed, however Shaar Tzion 530:4 points out that it’s not as strict as Kavod of Yom Tov. Yalkut Yosef (Moadim pg 502) writes similarly.
  2. Mishna Brurah 530:1, Yalkut Yosef (Moadim pg 502), and Aruch HaShulchan 530:4 write that there’s an obligation to wear clothes a little better than weekday clothes. Nimukei Orach Chaim 530:3 and Chaye Adam 106:1 hold it’s an obligation to wear Shabbat clothes but one doesn’t need to wear Yom Tov clothes that are a little better than Shabbat clothes. Mishna Brurah 530:1 brings the Maharil who had the practice to wear Shabbat clothes on Chol HaMoed.
  3. Pri Megadim 639 (M”Z 639:1) and Aruch HaShulchan 530:4
  4. S”A 188:7 writes that since there’s no obligation to have a meal on Chol HaMoed is one forgets Yaaleh VeYavo one doesn’t repeat Brikat HaMazon. Magan Avraham 530:1, Mishna Brurah 530:1, Yalkut Yosef (Moedim pg 502) write that it’s preferable to have bread since Kavod is with food and the most important food is bread.
  5. Rambam Hilchot Yom Tov 6:17, brought as Halacha in S”A HaRav 529:6-7, Yalkut Yosef (Moadim pg 502)
  6. Regarding simcha of Yom Tov, Pesachim 109a says that nowadays when there’s no Korbanot shlamim one fulfills simcha with wine. The Gemara continues that women fulfill their simcha with new clothes and children with toys and candies. This is brought as Halacha in Rambam (Yom Tov 6:17) and S”A 529:2. Rambam (Mitzvah 54) and Chinuch (Mitzvah 488) hold that Simcha is a Mitzvah Deoritta nowadays, however, Tosfot (Moed Katan 14b D”H Aseh) holds that Simcha is only fulfilled Derabbanan nowadays. According to Magan Avraham 530:1, Nimukei Orach Chaim 530:2, Moadim UZmanim 1:29 there’s no obligation to have wine on Chol HaMoed (this may be based on Sukkah 47b). However, Hilchot Chol HaMoed Zichron Shlomo (by Rabbi Dovid Zucker Siman 1) writes that from Rambam 6:17 it seems that all the days of the holiday are the same in how to fulfill Simcha. Similarly, Sh”t Rabbi Akiva Eiger 1 (in the Hashmatot), Hilchot Chol HaMoed Zichron Shlomo (Buir 1) in name of Rav Yacov Kamenetsky, Rav Moshe Feinstein and the Debersiner Rav who hold that there’s a reason to have wine to fulfill simcha.
  7. Hilchot Chol HaMoed Zichron Shlomo (Buir 1:2) quotes Rabbi Moshe Feinstien and the Debersiner Rav who say that grape juice doesn’t fulfill the mitzvah of simcha. Nemukei Orach Chaim 529:2 writes that one should have a reviyat of wine, while Hilchot Chol HaMoed Zichron Shlomo (pg 3; based on Sh”t Rosh 25:1) writes that a Meloh Lugmav is sufficient.
  8. S"A 124:10, Kitzur S"A 19:11
  9. In general, Rambam and Rosh hold the melacha is Derabbanan, while Rashi and the Rif hold it’s Deoritta (see Bet Yosef 530). In conclusion, Buir Halacha 530 D”H Umater brings many ריאשונים who hold melacha on Chol HaMoed is Deoritta and concludes that even though Shulchan Aruch holds that melacha is Derabbanan, one shouldn’t be lenient unless there’s a great need. However, Yalkut Yosef (Moadim pg 504) writes that one may be lenient like Shulchan Aruch and if there’s a safek (dispute in halacha) one can be lenient as it’s only derabbanan.
  10. S”A 535:1 writes that one may not move homes on Chol HaMoed. Mishna Brurah 535:1 explains that it’s forbidden because of the tircha (exertion) involved.
  11. Hilchot Chol HaMoed Zichron Shlomo (pg 7) brings this as an example of forbidden exertion on Chol HaMoed.
  12. Buir Halacha 539 D”H Eino Mutar, quoted by Hilchot Chol HaMoed Zichron Shlomo (pg 8)
  13. Hilchot Chol HaMoed Zichron Shlomo (pg 8) in name of Rav Moshe Feinstein.
  14. Hilchot Chol HaMoed Zichron Shlomo (pg 8-9) writes that there’s four exceptions to the forbidden melachot of Chol HaMoed including: carrying, techum, muktzah, and VeDvar Dvar. Shemirat Shabbat KeHilchata 68:26 writes that besides these four there’s also no melacha of Havarah (lighting a fire), Gezerah about Tevilat Kelim and removing Trumah.
  15. Yalkut Yosef (Kitzur S”A 530:5) writes that Shevitat Behemto and Mechamer don’t apply on Chol HaMoed. However, Biur Halacha (536 D”H UMutar Lirkov) writes that there’s a Safek Safeka to be lenient and one shouldn’t protest those who are lenient in this case. Chol HaMoed KeHilchato 2:14 writes that the only reason to be lenient is the Safek Safeka and those who hold melacha is Deoritta would hold it’s forbidden. Shemirat Shabbat KeHilchata 68:26 writes that there’s room to be lenient unless the animal is doing a Deoritta prohibition.
  16. Hilchot Chol HaMoed Zichron Shlomo (pg 22)
  17. S”A 318:1 rules that if one violates Shabbat unintentionally, the work is prohibited from benefit until after Shabbat and for intention violations, the work is prohibited for the perpetrator forever and everyone else is permitted after Shabbat. Magan Avraham 538:2 says that this same prohibitions would apply to someone who violates Chol HaMoed according to those that melacha on Chol HaMoed is Deoritta. However, if melacha on CHol haMoed is Derabbanan, there’s shouldn’t be any prohibitions just like Derabbanan melachot on Shabbat. (Biur Halacha 318 D”H HaMivashel who writes in name of the Gra and Chaye Adam that a Derabbanan Melacha is permitted on Shabbat itself.) Hilchot Chol HaMoed Zichron Shlomo (pg 15) writes that for this safek one can be lenient based on the fact that the entire prohibition is a rabbinic penalty. However, writes the Hilchot Chol Moed, for an intentional violation, there’s more reason to be strict based on Mishna Brurah 538:16.
  18. Tur writes that all of the melachas of Shabbat and Yom Tov apply to Chol HaMed with five exceptions. All the achronim bring this as Halacha including Mishna Brurah 530:1.
  19. Chol HaMoed Zichron Shlomo (pg 11)
  20. Chol HaMoed Zichron Shlomo (pg 36)
  21. Chol HaMoed Zichron Shlomo (pg 47)
  22. Chol HaMoed Zichron Shlomo (pg 51)
  23. Chol HaMoed Zichron Shlomo (pg 17)
  24. Chol HaMoed Zichron Shlomo (pg 36)
  25. Chol HaMoed Zichron Shlomo (pg 47)
  26. Chol HaMoed Zichron Shlomo (pg 52)
  27. Chol HaMoed Zichron Shlomo (pg 61)
  28. Chol HaMoed Zichron Shlomo (pg 36)
  29. Chol HaMoed Zichron Shlomo (pg 47)
  30. Chol HaMoed Zichron Shlomo (pg 61)
  31. Chol HaMoed Zichron Shlomo (pg 16)
  32. Chol HaMoed Zichron Shlomo (pg 36)
  33. Chol HaMoed Zichron Shlomo (pg 47)
  34. Chol HaMoed Zichron Shlomo (pg 51)
  35. Chol HaMoed Zichron Shlomo (pg 23)
  36. Chol HaMoed Zichron Shlomo (pg 37)
  37. Chol HaMoed Zichron Shlomo (pg 47)
  38. Chol HaMoed Zichron Shlomo (pg 52)
  39. Chol HaMoed Zichron Shlomo (pg 18)
  40. Chol HaMoed Zichron Shlomo (pg 37)
  41. Chol HaMoed Zichron Shlomo (pg 47)
  42. Mishna Brurah 540:1
  43. Shemirat Shabbat KeHilchata 66:38 based on Mishna Brurah 540:7. Aruch HaShulchan 540:4 forbids great exertion Pri Megadim M”Z 540:3 permits even great exertion. (Shemirat Shabbat KeHilchata 66:38 adds that the pri megadim means that it’s permitted if it’s a מעשה hedyot or shinui.) See Nishmat Adam 110:1. Netivei Moed 7:2 says tzorech hamoed must be hedyot and one should still minimize the exertion.
  44. Hilchot Chol HaMoed Zichron Shlomo (pg 18-9), Pitchei Teshuvot 530:1
  45. Pri Megadim A”A intro to 537 writes that even if there’s a Safek Dvar Aved one may do work on Chol HaMoed, so rules Hilchot Chol HaMoed Zichron Shlomo (pg 17) writes that there only needs to be a reasonable possibility. However, the Mishna Brurah 537:1 writes that it must appear in one’s eyes that it’s close to being a Tzorech HaMoed. So rules the Shemirat Shabbat KeHilchata 66:34.
  46. S”A 536:1
  47. Based on Bet Yosef 534 and Magan Avraham 544:1, Hilchot Chol HaMoed Zichron Shlomo (pg 12) writes that if one can borrow a replacement one must not fix the broken object.
  48. Hilchot Chol HaMoed Zichron Shlomo (pg 19)
  49. Hilchot Chol HaMoed Zichron Shlomo (pg 19-20)
  50. S"A 537:1, Hilchot Chol HaMoed Zichron Shlomo (pg 21)
  51. Hilchot Chol HaMoed Zichron Shlomo (pg 21), Chol HaMoed KeHilchato (7:4 pg 234)
  52. Hilchot Chol HaMoed Zichron Shlomo (pg 22)
  53. Hilchot Chol HaMoed Zichron Shlomo (pg 21)
  54. Pri Megadim 533 M”Z is in doubt whether one may cook from one day of Chol HaMoed for another, however the Kaf HaChaim 533:6 rules it’s permissible. So rules Hilchot Chol HaMoed Zichron Shlomo (pg 18) that it’s permissible. Additionally, Hagot Rabbi Akiva Eiger 539:11, Eshel Avraham 330, and Hilchot Chol HaMoed Zichron Shlomo (pg 18) write that it’s permissible to cook from Chol HaMoed to Yom Tov including Yom Tov Sheni of Galiyot.
  55. Magan Avraham 545:25 and Mishna Brurah 545:48 say that preparatory work that’s necessary for a Tzorech HaMoed is permissible such as preparing a quill and ink to write things that are permitted to write on Chol HaMoed.
  56. Hilchot Chol HaMoed Zichron Shlomo (pg 17)
  57. S”A 542:1
  58. Hilchot Chol HaMoed Zichron Shlomo (pg 16) based on Buir Halacha 541 D”H Elah and 542 D”H Afilu.
  59. Hilchot Chol HaMoed Zichron Shlomo (pg 12) based on the principles of Tzorech HaMoed.
  60. Hilchot Chol HaMoed Zichron Shlomo (pg 15, 22)
  61. Hilchot Chol HaMoed Zichron Shlomo (pg 23), Shemirat Shabbat KeHilchata 66:59
  62. Minchat Yom Tov 104:2 writes that since it’s normal to wash the floor twice a week it’s permissible to wash the floors on Chol Hamoed even if it’s a excessive work, however, scrubbing the floor to remove dirt is forbidden as it involves a melacha and requires excessive effort. Hilchot Chol HaMoed Zichron Shlomo (pg 19) extends this to floors that are cleaned once a week, and permits vacuuming as well.
  63. Hilchot Chol HaMoed Zichron Shlomo (pg 15) rules like Sh”t Shevet HaLevi 1:166(3) even though he quotes the Debrinsiner Rav who says that it’s a maaseh uman and involves a tircha.
  64. Hilchot Chol HaMoed Zichron Shlomo (pg 38) writes in name of the Debrinsiner Rav that it’s forbidden to fish for pleasure and points out that Rav Moshe Feinstein permits. However many others side are strict including Sh”t Rivevot Efraim 1:356(2) and Chol HaMoed KeHilchato in name of Rav Shlomo Zalman Aurerbach and Rav Wosner. Hilchot Chol HaMoed Zichron Shlomo (pg 38) writes that (according to all) one can be lenient if the fish will be eaten.
  65. Hilchot Chol HaMoed Zichron Shlomo (pg 14) writes that nowadays most men aren’t adept at sewing.
  66. Hilchot Chol HaMoed Zichron Shlomo (pg 14)
  67. Hilchot Chol HaMoed Zichron Shlomo (pg 14) quotes Rav Yacov Kamenetsky and the Debrinsiner Rav who allow if the action is significantly changed such as it’s loose and one only sews it through 2 holes. Hilchot Chol HaMoed continues to quote Rav Moshe Feinstein who forbids unless there’s no other clothes to wear.
  68. Hilchot Chol HaMoed Zichron Shlomo (pg 37)
  69. S”A 533:1
  70. S”A 533:1 writes that if one already has flour one should not ground new flour; however, even if one has bread one may cook new bread since hot bread is tastier. So rules Hilchot Chol HaMoed Zichron Shlomo (pg 37)
  71. Buir Halacha 542, Hilchot Chol HaMoed Zichron Shlomo (pg 36)
  72. Hilchot Chol HaMoed Zichron Shlomo (pg 38). S”A 537:15 regarding fruits, Mishna Brurah 533:14, 18 regarding fish.
  73. S”A 533:1
  74. S”A 527:23 rules this regarding Yom Tov and Hilchot Chol HaMoed Zichron Shlomo (pg 38) writes that this is true regarding Chol HaMoed as well.
  75. Hilchot Chol HaMoed Zichron Shlomo (pg 36)
  76. Hilchot Chol HaMoed Zichron Shlomo (pg 37)
  77. S”A 540:7-8, Mishna Brurah 540:27
  78. Mishna Brurah 540:18 and 537:15, Hilchot Chol HaMoed Zichron Shlomo (pg 39)
  79. Mishna Brurah 540:27, Hilchot Chol HaMoed Zichron Shlomo (pg 40)
  80. Hilchot Chol HaMoed Zichron Shlomo (pg 40)
  81. Hilchot Chol HaMoed Zichron Shlomo (pg 41)
  82. Hilchot Chol HaMoed Zichron Shlomo (pg 41)
  83. Hilchot Chol HaMoed Zichron Shlomo (pg 42)
  84. Hilchot Chol HaMoed Zichron Shlomo (pg 43)
  85. Hilchot Chol HaMoed Zichron Shlomo (pg 45)
  86. Hilchot Chol HaMoed Zichron Shlomo (pg 45)
  87. http://www.yutorah.org/lectures/lecture.cfm/733780/Rabbi_Hershel_Schachter/Hilchos_Chol_Hamoed min 29-30, Rav Hershel Schachter holds that it’s permissible to schedule a doctor’s appointment even lechatchila and even if you planned to go on Chol HaMoed. Whereas Hilchot Chol HaMoed Zichron Shlomo (pg 46) quotes Rav Moshe Feinstein saying that one should not have a routine checkup if it does not involve a Melacha such as drawing blood.
  88. S”A 531:1
  89. S”A 531:2
  90. S”A 531:2
  91. Hilchot Chol HaMoed Zichron Shlomo (pg 26)
  92. Mishna Brurah 531:16
  93. S”A 531:3
  94. S”A 531:4, Hilchot Chol HaMoed Zichron Shlomo (pg 27)
  95. S”A 531:5
  96. Hilchot Chol HaMoed Zichron Shlomo (pg 29) quoting Mishna Brurah 531:21
  97. Rama 531:8
  98. Hilchot Chol HaMoed Zichron Shlomo (pg 26)
  99. Sh"t Igrot Moshe 1:163, Rabbi Shmuel Marcus
  100. S”A 532:1 holds it’s permissible, while Rama 532:1 writes that the minhag is to be strict on this issue. Yalkut Yosef (Kitzur S”A 531-2:10) writes that Sephardim follow S”A, and Hilchot Chol HaMoed Zichron Shlomo (pg 29) writes that the Ashkenazic minhag is like the Rama.
  101. Mishna Brurah 532:2
  102. Mishna Brurah 532:3
  103. Hilchot Chol HaMoed Zichron Shlomo (pg 30) quoting Bear Hetiev 532:1
  104. Rama 532:1
  105. S”A 534:1, Hilchot Chol HaMoed Zichron Shlomo (pg 34)
  106. Hilchot Chol HaMoed Zichron Shlomo (pg 30)
  107. Hilchot Chol HaMoed Zichron Shlomo (pg 32)
  108. Mishna Brurah 534:2, Hilchot Chol HaMoed Zichron Shlomo (pg 30)
  109. S”A 534:1, Hilchot Chol HaMoed Zichron Shlomo (pg 30)
  110. Rama 534:1
  111. Hilchot Chol HaMoed Zichron Shlomo (pg 32-3)
  112. Hilchot Chol HaMoed Zichron Shlomo (pg 33)
  113. Hilchot Chol HaMoed Zichron Shlomo (pg 33)
  114. Hilchot Chol HaMoed Zichron Shlomo (pg 33)
  115. Hilchot Chol HaMoed Zichron Shlomo (pg 33-4)
  116. Hilchot Chol HaMoed Zichron Shlomo (pg 33)
  117. Hilchot Chol HaMoed Zichron Shlomo (pg 34)
  118. Hilchot Chol HaMoed Zichron Shlomo (pg 34)
  119. S”A 535:1 writes that one may not move homes on Chol HaMoed. Mishna Brurah 535:1 explains that it’s forbidden because of the tircha (exertion) involved. S”A writes that it’s only forbidden to move from one courtyard to another, however within the same courtyard it’s permitted. Hilchot Chol HaMoed Zichron Shlomo (pg 7) writes in name of the Drinsiner Rav that since nowadays people have many possessions and moving always involved exertion it’s forbidden in any manner. Shemirat Shabbat KeHilchata 68:24 (footnote 86) seemingly disagrees with this and yet leaves the leniency of moving within the chetzer out of the halachas probably because nowadays we don’t have groups of houses in small courtyards.
  120. S”A 535:1 writes that one may not move homes from one courtyard to another, however, in 535:2 he permits if one is moving from someone else’s home to one’s own home. Mishna Brurah 535:7 explains that moving to one’s own home is permitted because it’s a Simcha for him, yet, it’s not permitted if one is just moving from a ugly or small house to a nicer or bigger one. Shaar Tzion 535:5 writes that the same leniency would be true if one is moving from a joint home to one’s own home. Shemirat Shabbat KeHilchata 68:24 quotes this as halacha. However, Hilchot Chol HaMoed Zichron Shlomo (pg 7) writes that one shouldn’t move unless there’s more serious needs such as if the living conditions are intolerable or there’s a loss of money. Mishna Brurah 535:7, Hilchot Chol HaMoed Zichron Shlomo (pg 7), and Shemirat Shabbat KeHilchata 68:24 write that each case should be judged by a rabbinic authority.
  121. S”A 539:1 writes that buying or selling in any amount is forbidden on Chol HaMoed. Mishna Brurah 539:1 explains that the reason is exertion.
  122. Hilchot Chol HaMoed Zichron Shlomo (pg 72-73)
  123. Hilchot Chol HaMoed Zichron Shlomo (pg 73-7)
  124. Hilchot Chol HaMoed Zichron Shlomo (pg 75-6)
  125. Hilchot Chol HaMoed Zichron Shlomo (pg 76-77)
  126. Hilchot Chol HaMoed Zichron Shlomo (pg 78) writes that Rav Moshe Feinstein considers typing to be non-professional writing, while, Rav Yacov Kamentsky and other poskim consider tying professional writing. Shemirat Shabbat KeHilchata also considers tying to be non-professional writing.
  127. Hilchot Chol HaMoed Zichron Shlomo (pg 78) quotes Rav Moshe as permitting and Rav Yacov Kamenetsky as forbidding.
  128. Hilchot Chol HaMoed Zichron Shlomo (pg 79) quotes Rav Moshe as permitting and Rav Yacov Kamenetsky as forbidding.
  129. Hilchot Chol HaMoed Zichron Shlomo (pg 79)
  130. Rav Schachter on [OU Pre-Pesach Webcast 5771] between minutes 62 and 64:15
  131. Rav Schachter on [OU Pre-Pesach Webcast 5771] between minutes 62 and 64:15
  132. S”A 546:1
  133. Hilchot Chol HaMoed Zichron Shlomo (pg 106-7)
  134. S”A and Rama 31:2, Sh”t Yabea Omer 3:5(3)
  135. Sh”t Teshuvot VeHanhagot 2:332
  136. Mishna Brurah 31:8
  137. Mishna Brurah 31:8
  138. Hilchot Chol HaMoed Zichron Shlomo (in the hebrew section pg 39-40) has a letter from Rav Moshe Feinstein, dated Kislev 5737, stating clearly that one should follow the minhag of the Shul and if the minhag is to wear Tefillin one should also. However, Rav Moshe Feinstein in Sh”t Igrot Moshe O”C 5:24 (pg 79 D”H Al Kol Panim) dated Kislev 5743, writes that in crowded shuls where there’s many who wear Tefillin and many who don’t there’s no issue of Lo Tasu Agudot since it’s clear that there’s two different minhagim. However, Rav Moshe adds that preferably someone who is praying in a shul that wears Tefillin should also wear Tefillin. Sh”t Teshuvot VeHanhagot 2:332 holds that there’s no real issue of Lo Titgodedu but preferably one should be concerned for those who hold that it’s an issue.
  139. S”A 543:1